Category: History

via HACKADAY: Beeping The Enemy Into Submission

In July 1940 the German airforce began bombing Britain. This was met with polite disagreement on the British side — and with high technology, ingenuity, and improvisation. The defeat of the Germans is associated with anti-aircraft guns and fighter planes, but a significant amount of potential damage had been averted by the use of radio. […]

via HACKADAY: How to Test a B-52 Against EMP: Project ATLAS-I

Audacious times generate audacious efforts, especially when national pride and security are perceived to be at stake. Such was the case in the 1950s and 1960s, with the Space Race that started with a Russian sphere whizzing around the planet and ended with Neil Armstrong’s footprint on the Moon. But at the same time, other […]

via HACKADAY: You All Know Reginald Fessenden. Who?

Quick, name someone influential in the history of radio. Who do did you think of? Marconi? Tesla? Armstrong? Hertz? Perhaps Sarnoff? We bet only a handful would have said Reginald Fessenden. That’s a shame because he was the first to do something that most of us do every day. Few know this Canadian inventor’s name […]

via HACKADAY: Retrotechtacular: AM Radios, Core Memory, And Color TV, What Was Hot In Chips In ’73

As part of writing tech stories such as those we feature here at Hackaday, there is a huge amount of research to be done.  We trawl through pages and pages of obscure blogs, videos, and data sheets. Sometimes we turn up resources interesting enough that we file them away, convinced that they contain the nucleus of […]

via HACKADAY: This IS Your Grandfather’s Radio

Tube radios have a certain charm. Waiting for them to warm up, that glow of the filaments in a dark room. Tubes ruled radio for many decades. [Uniservo] posted a video about the history and technology behind the 1920’s era Clapp-Eastham C-3 radio. This is a three-tube regenerative receiver and was advanced for its day. If you […]

via the ARRL: ARRL Receives Byrd Antarctic Expedition Morse Key, Historical Materials

ARRL has received from Lynn Burlingame, N7CFO, the donation of a Kilbourne & Clark Morse key that the late Howard Mason (1ID, 7BU, and K7QB) used to let the world know that Rear Admiral Richard Byrd and his crew had overflown the South Pole for the first time during Byrd’s 1928 – 1930 Antarctic expedition. […]

via HACKADAY: Dust Off Those AM Radios, There’s Something Good On!

If you are into vintage electronics or restoring antique radio equipment you may be very disappointed with the content offerings on AM broadcast radio these days. Fortunately there is a way to get around this: build your own short-range AM broadcast station and transmit curated content to your radios (and possibly your neighbors). There are […]

30 Years Later, Notorious ‘Max Headroom Incident’ Remains a Mystery (Illinois)

Chicago television has a rich and colorful history. But few moments are quite as colorful—or bizarre—as the incident that happened to this very station in 1987. It was Nov. 22, 1987—a Sunday night—and “Doctor Who” fans had just settled in to watch a rerun of the episode “Horror at Fang Rock.” Suddenly, the Doctor was […]

via HACKADAY: Radio Apocalypse: The Emergency Broadcast System

Some sounds are capable of evoking instant terror. It might be the shriek of a mountain lion, or a sudden clap of thunder. Whatever your trigger sound, it instantly stimulates something deep in the lizard brain that says: get ready, danger is at hand. For my part, you can’t get much scarier than the instantly recognizable […]

via HACKADAY: Jeri Ellsworth Tours A Radio And Tech Museum

[Jeri Ellsworth] has done some YouTubing again (yes, that’s a word, just like YouTuber) after a four-year hiatus. She’s recently uploaded a very enjoyable four-part series touring the Museum of Radio and Technology in Huntington, West Virginia. Part one contains radios spanning the ages, starting with a spark gap transmitter, some wonderful crystal sets, pocket […]

Retro radios are what he’s tuned in to (New York)

It’s a scene Terry Adelwerth has witnessed multiple times: A car pulls into a radio swap meet in upstate Rochester, and before the driver has a chance to shift into park, people surround the vehicle and are pulling on the door handles. “He’s rolling to a stop and they’re opening his doors and grabbing stuff,” […]

via HACKADAY: Retrotechtacular: Radio to Listen to When you Duck and Cover

CONELRAD may sound like the name of a fictional android, but it is actually an acronym for control of electronic radiation. This was a system put in place by the United States at the height of the cold war (from 1951 to 1963) with two purposes: One was to disseminate civil defense information to the […]

This Week in Amateur Radio © 2017 Community Video Associates, Inc.